March312014
December52013
10PM

dynamicafrica:

“When a man is denied the right to live the life he believes in, he has no choice but to become an outlaw.” - Nelson Mandela.

RIP Madiba. Hamba kahle, Tata Madiba. Go well.

(via greye)

September192013

iluvsouthernafrica:

South Africa:

Incredible portraits of the Ndebele by Constance Stuart Larrabee (1941-1945)

(via nappyhairandgoldteeth)

9AM

tontonmichel:

my-africa-is-beautiful:

My Africa is beautiful 

Breathtaking

(via shabazzpizazz)

9AM
dynamicafrica:

Photograph of a tattooed Yoruba woman.
If you’d like to know more about body marks, scarification and tattooing in Yoruba culture, this video of Chief Atanda explaining the history and meaning behind it will shed a lot of light on this practice.
Further reading.
AUGUST: Celebrating African Women

dynamicafrica:

Photograph of a tattooed Yoruba woman.

If you’d like to know more about body marks, scarification and tattooing in Yoruba culture, this video of Chief Atanda explaining the history and meaning behind it will shed a lot of light on this practice.

Further reading.

AUGUST: Celebrating African Women

9AM
endilletante:


Le Soudan de Oswald Iten (textes et photographies), editions Silva, Zurich, 1979.

endilletante:

Le Soudan de Oswald Iten (textes et photographies), editions Silva, Zurich, 1979.

(via futurephar0ahs)

9AM
massmirage:

“A Chieftain of Gambia presides over his court with the dignity and pomp of the kings of old.  The crown, resembling the British crown, is of gold, studded with precious stones and mounted on ermine and velvet.  By not wearing a shirt he reminds his people that he has strong shoulders and the arms of a hunter and a fighter.”

massmirage:

“A Chieftain of Gambia presides over his court with the dignity and pomp of the kings of old.  The crown, resembling the British crown, is of gold, studded with precious stones and mounted on ermine and velvet.  By not wearing a shirt he reminds his people that he has strong shoulders and the arms of a hunter and a fighter.”

(via dynamicafrica)

8AM
desert-dreamer:

Fulani/Peul woman, circa 1900, Guinea/Mali.

desert-dreamer:

Fulani/Peul woman, circa 1900, Guinea/Mali.

(via funkchunk)

8AM

seshatarchitecture:

Gurunsi architecture in Burkina Faso and Ghana

(via blackjatovia)

8AM
vicemag:

Uganda Is Taking Israel’s Unwanted Asylum Seekers to Get Cheaper Weapons
Earlier this month, it was reported that Israel was trying to swap Africans for arms. Or, more specifically, broker a deal with a number of unspecified African countries that would see thousands of African refugees included in lucrative deals for Israeli weapons and military training. If you take back these annoying, resources-sapping asylum seekers, the Israelis seemed to be saying, you can buy our guns for cheap.
The Israeli government is currently detaining thousands of African asylum seekers in desert prisons on the Egyptian border. Many of them now face being shipped off, against their will, to whichever African country will take them. Seemingly no thought has been paid to sending asylum seekers back to oppressive regimes they may have been fleeing in the first place.  
It seems that a deal has now been struck, as late last week Israeli Interior Minister Gideon Sa’ar announced that he would start the process of deporting migrants to Uganda.    
The Israeli government already have strong relations with their Ugandan counterparts, with Israel currently “working to introduce sophisticated agro-technology" to the country. But it is newer support to Uganda’s military—weapons, training, fighter jets, and possibly drones—that many suspect to be behind the country’s decision to import asylum seekers from Israel.
"We’re hoping to operate in the coming weeks and months in a way that will make another exit for infiltrators in the country,” Sa’ar explained, “while trying to reach agreements with more countries.”
Continue

vicemag:

Uganda Is Taking Israel’s Unwanted Asylum Seekers to Get Cheaper Weapons

Earlier this month, it was reported that Israel was trying to swap Africans for arms. Or, more specifically, broker a deal with a number of unspecified African countries that would see thousands of African refugees included in lucrative deals for Israeli weapons and military training. If you take back these annoying, resources-sapping asylum seekers, the Israelis seemed to be saying, you can buy our guns for cheap.

The Israeli government is currently detaining thousands of African asylum seekers in desert prisons on the Egyptian border. Many of them now face being shipped off, against their will, to whichever African country will take them. Seemingly no thought has been paid to sending asylum seekers back to oppressive regimes they may have been fleeing in the first place.  

It seems that a deal has now been struck, as late last week Israeli Interior Minister Gideon Sa’ar announced that he would start the process of deporting migrants to Uganda.    

The Israeli government already have strong relations with their Ugandan counterparts, with Israel currently “working to introduce sophisticated agro-technology" to the country. But it is newer support to Uganda’s military—weapons, training, fighter jets, and possibly drones—that many suspect to be behind the country’s decision to import asylum seekers from Israel.

"We’re hoping to operate in the coming weeks and months in a way that will make another exit for infiltrators in the country,” Sa’ar explained, “while trying to reach agreements with more countries.”

Continue

(via dynamicafrica)

September122013
“Our revolution is not a public-speaking tournament. Our revolution is not a battle of fine phrases. Our revolution is not simply for spouting slogans that are no more than signals used by manipulators trying to use them as catchwords, as codewords, as a foil for their own display. Our revolution is, and should continue to be, the collective effort of revolutionaries to transform reality, to improve the concrete situation of the masses of our country.” Thomas Sankara. (via brainlessbull)

(via kosdetermination)

September112013

dynamicafrica:

September 12th marks the anniversary of the death of one of South Africa’s most prolific and pioneering anti-Apartheid activists, Stephen Bantu Biko.

Biko rose to prominence as a student leader whilst at university, establishing the all-black and pro-black South African Students Organisation (SASO).  He later became the leader of the Black Consciousness Movement (BCM) in the early 70s, an ideological revolution aimed at the uplifting of black culture in the face of the systematic and racially oppressive system that was Apartheid.

The growth of the BCM threatened the structure of Apartheid so much so that in 1973 Biko was banned, by the South African government, from taking part in any political activity and was confined to the magisterial district of King William’s Town, his birth place.

In spite of being banned, Biko continued to advance the work of Black Consciousness. For instance, he established an Eastern Cape branch of BCP and through BCP he organised literacy and dressmaking classes and health education programmes. Quite significantly, he set up a health clinic outside King William’s Town for poor rural Blacks who battled to access city hospitals.

In the wake of the urban revolt of 1976 and with the prospects of national revolution becoming increasingly real, security police detained Biko, the outspoken student leader, on August 18th. At this time Biko had begun studying law by mail through the University of South Africa/UNISA. He was thirty years old and was reportedly extremely fit when arrested. He was taken to Port Elizabeth but was later transferred to Pretoria where he died in detention under mysterious circumstances in 1977.

Due to local and international outcry his death prompted an inquest which at first did not adequately reveal the circumstances surrounding his death. Police alleged that he died from a hunger strike and independent sources said he was brutally murdered by police. Although his death was attributed to “a prison accident,” evidence presented during the 15-day inquest into Biko’s death revealed otherwise. During his detention in a Port Elizabeth police cell he had been chained to a grill at night and left to lie in urine-soaked blankets. He had been stripped naked and kept in leg-irons for 48 hours in his cell. A blow in a scuffle with security police led to him suffering brain damage by the time he was driven naked and manacled in the back of a police van to Pretoria, where, on 12 September 1977 he died.

Two years later a South African Medical and Dental Council (SAMDC) disciplinary committee found there was no prima facie case against the two doctors who had treated Biko shortly before his death. Dissatisfied doctors, seeking another inquiry into the role of the medical authorities who had treated Biko shortly before his death, presented a petition to the SAMDC in February 1982, but this was rejected on the grounds that no new evidence had come to light. Biko’s death caught the attention of the international community, which increased the pressure on the South African government to abolish its detention policies and called for an international probe on the cause of his death. Even close allies of South Africa, Britain and the United States of America, expressed deep concern about the death of Biko. They also joined the increasing demand for an international probe.

It took eight years and intense pressure before the South African Medical Council took disciplinary action. On 30 January, 1985, the Pretoria Supreme Court ordered the SAMDC to hold an inquiry into the conduct of the two doctors who treated Steve Biko during the five days before he died. Judge President of the Transvaal, Justice W G Boshoff, said in a landmark judgment that there was prima facie evidence of improper or disgraceful conduct on the part of the “Biko” doctors in a professional respect. This serves to illustrate that so many years after Biko’s death his influence lived on.

He is survived by his two sons.

September82013
2AM

dynamicafrica:

Vintage photos of a ‘masquerade' in Boromo, Burkina Faso (then Haute Volta).

(circa 1930-1940)

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